You Will Not Be Forgotten of Me

Tags

Native American Heritage Month: November

“You have despised the poor” (James 2:6 KJV).

Above a half-century ago, not long after my husband and I were married, in our church was an elderly widow, of Native American extraction, about seventy-five, large-boned, with high cheek bones, straight black hair (it never grayed), russet-brown, sinewy skin, and a few remaining discolored teeth. She wore ordinary street clothes, black or somber colors, no jewelry, and, each service, sat alone, about the third or fourth pew back, near the aisle—as if people didn’t want to associate with her, though, I noticed, that when asked, she gave a rousing testimony. Continue reading

Time Gone

Tags

,

God meets us where we are—in the human condition.
“For He knows our frame; He remembers that we are dust” (Psalm 103:14 NKJV).

“The years teach much which the days never knew.”  ~Ralph Waldo Emerson

When I was younger, I envied  old people. All my friends were old. I wanted to be old too. Now I am. Only they’ve passed on, and I cannot be old with them. Continue reading

Walking Away

Tags

Practical Christian Theology
God meets us where we are—in the human condition.
“For He knows our frame; He remembers that we are dust” (Psalm 103:14 NKJV).

Deal with another as you’d have
Another deal with you;
What you’re unwilling to receive,
Be sure you never do. ~New England Primer

The other day a televangelist captured a headline when he said that a husband (already dating, no less) could legitimately divorce a wife suffering from Alzheimers. Evidently he agrees with Carl Young that “We need to alter the wedding vow. Till death do us part or until you become an inconvenience.”   Continue reading

The Domestic Circle*

Tags

,

Practical Christian Theology
Guest Writer Thomas DeWitt Talmage

“Go home to your friends, and tell them what great things the Lord has done for you” (Mark 5:19).

Many people are longing for some grand sphere in which to serve God. They admire Luther at the Diet of Worms and wish they had such grand opportunity in which to display their Christian prowess. They admire Paul making Felix tremble (Acts 24:25) and wish they had some such grand occasion to preach righteousness, temperance, and judgement. All they want is an opportunity to exhibit their Christian heroism. Continue reading

The Old Folk’s Visit*

Tags

,

Practical Christian Theology
Guest Writer Thomas DeWitt Talmage

“I will go and see him before I die” (Genesis 45:28).

Jacob had long since passed the 100-year milestone (cf Genesis 47:9, 28). In his day persons were distinguished for longevity. In the centuries after, persons still lived to great age. Galen, the most celebrated physician of his time, took so little of his own medicine, that he lived to be 140 years old. A man of undoubted veracity on the witness stand in England swore that he remembered an event that happened 150 years before. Lord Bacon speaks of a countess who had cut three sets of teeth, and died at 140 years. Continue reading

Woman Enthroned*

Tags

,

Practical Christian Theology
Guest Writer Thomas DeWitt Talmage

“There are threescore queens” (Song of Solomon 6:8).

Solomon, by one stroke, sets forth the imperial character of a true Christian woman. She is not a slave, not a hireling, not a subordinate, but a queen; and in my text Solomon sees sixty of these helping to make up the royal pageant of Jesus. Crown, courtly attendants, and imperial wardrobe are not necessary to make a queen; but graces of the heart and life will give coronation to any woman. Continue reading

Trials of Housekeeping*

Tags

,

Practical Christian Theology
Guest Writer Thomas DeWitt Talmage

“Lord, do You not care that my sister has left me to serve alone? Tell her to help me” (Luke 10:40).

Yonder is a beautiful village homestead. The man of the house is dead, we assume, and his widow is head of household: Martha of Bethany. Yes, I will show you also the pet of the household: Mary, the younger sister, with a book under her arm, her face anxiousless and at peace. Company has come. Christ stands outside the door and, of course, there is a good deal of excitement inside the door. The room is hastily refreshed, the hair is brushed back, and the dresses are smoothed. Continue reading

Siblings*

Tags

,

Practical Christian Theology
Guest Writer Thomas DeWitt Talmage

“And his sister stood afar off, to see what would be done to him”
(Exodus 2:4).

Princess Thermutis, daughter of Pharaoh, looked out through the lattice of her bathhouse, on the banks of the River Nile, and saw a curious boat. The vessel was made of broad leaves of papyrus tightened together by bitumen. As we learn from Pliny, Herodotus, and Theophrastus, boats were sometimes made of that material; but this one, having neither oar nor helm, would have been useless for navigation. There was only one passenger, and that a baby boy. But the Mayflower that brought the Pilgrim Fathers to America carried not so precious a cargo! Continue reading

The Mother of All Living*

Tags

,

Practical Christian Theology
Guest Writer Thomas DeWitt Talmage

“The Lord God caused a deep sleep to fall on Adam, and he slept; and He took one of his ribs and closed up the flesh; and from the rib, which the Lord God had taken from man, made He a woman, and brought her to the man” (Genesis 2:21, 22).

It is the first Saturday afternoon in the world’s existence. Since sunrise Adam has been watching the brilliant pageantry of wings, scales, and clouds, and in his first lessons in zoology [study of animals], ornithology [study of birds], and ichthyology [study of fish] he has noticed that the robins fly in twos, that the fish swim the water in twos, and that the lions walk the fields in twos. Continue reading